The Unrealistic Teachings of Academic Curriculums

Yesterday afternoon my mom showed me an article in Maclean’s magazine addressing the implications that can arise as a result of the poorly structured educational curriculum in Canada.

Actually, I shouldn’t just claim that the academic system in Canada is flawed – it is flawed in a global context.

The article explained how in school, whether it be elementary/high school level or university level, students learn how to do incredibly complex things however they are not taught basic life skills, for example how to do taxes, the basics of financial skills, essential automotive and mechanical knowledge or even domestic skills such as cooking and cleaning.

When you think about it, individuals enrolled in school are able to solve complicated math equations and are able to recognize Shakespearean works, however they are unable to fill out their income tax forms or change a tire on a vehicle.

Is it not fair to claim that the latter half of the knowledge listed above is more essential in everyday living than the former knowledge?

The article explained how it has been proposed by the Canadian government to implement a mandatory course into the high school curriculum that teaches young persons how to perform significant tasks that present themselves in everyday living, and I could not support this proposition more. The article also suggested that mandatory world religion courses should be integrated into school curriculums, and I would argue that sexuality courses should furthermore be introduced to the curriculum as a mandatory field of study. The world is evolving at a rapid speed in terms of religious and sexual diversity, and I think it is crucial to introduce individuals to such diversity from a young age in order to ensure acceptance and to avoid discrimination and prejudice.

It is 2016, soon to be 2017, and I have yet to learn how paying a mortgage works. But I know how to solve the Pythagorean Theorem, so that has to count for something, right?

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