The reality of living with your parents as a young adult

Living at home as a young adult is an interesting situation. I’m 24, I have two post-secondary certifications, and yet I’m still living with my parents.

Why, you may ask?

I can’t speak for everyone, but considering the current state of real estate here in Canada, I think it’s safe to say I won’t be owning a home anytime soon. It simply isn’t feasible for young Canadians to be living on their own while financially supporting themselves.

So, we’re still at home, trying to distinguish a balance between independence and familial dependence.

It’s about as riveting as it sounds.

Living at home as a young adult certainly has its perks, though. I’ve always been a homebody, and the farm is incredibly important to me, so I don’t necessarily mind being at home a little longer than initially anticipated. I recognize the fact that I’m fortunate to still live at home, and further my parents’ willingness to have me around longer than they likely expected to (sorry not sorry).

Something that can get a little hairy, though, when you have a house of parents and adult children, is the familial dynamic. When kids are young, it’s apparent (in most cases) that the parents have superiority. When kids are young adults, though, the familial dynamic changes a wee bit in the sense that you’re living in a house of adults as opposed to an adult/child balance. It may take a while to transition into a steady, balanced familial structure.

When my parents were my age, they had already married and were living together. Social trends have changed significantly since then, though, and to be honest, I’m quite content still living at home. I’m sure my parents would say differently, depending on the day, but for the most part, living at home when you’re an adult isn’t too bad.


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