Skin cancer is (very much) on the rise

An article from Queen Mary University of London reports some rather alarming findings pertaining to skin cancer.

Data originating from the UK skin cancer database has unveiled that there are over 45,000 “cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC) every year in England, 350 per cent more than previous estimates suggested,” the article states.

Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common type of skin cancer,

The database, developed by experts from Queen Mary and Public Health England, “fills in enormous gaps in the recording of skin cancer, ensuring that accurate numbers for the three most common types of skin cancer: melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and cSCC, are available for the whole of the UK,” the article explains.

I’m not sure about you, but a 350 per cent increase in cSCC cases each year in England is, to me, terrifying.

We all know that the sun is hot and that UV rays are dangerous. However, based on these research findings, I would argue that many of us are still ignorant of the dangers of the sun, and further, the importance of protecting ourselves from it.

I will admit that I am not the most cautious when it comes to sun safety. When I work outdoors on the farm in the summer, I rarely apply sunscreen, and often only do so after I’ve gotten sunburnt.

Perfectly logical, I know.

A key element of this situation that is crucial to keep in mind is the fact that the sun has become exponentially hotter in the last number of years thanks to global warming. Perhaps going without sunscreen in the middle of July 20 years ago was risk-free, but it certainly is not anymore.

Protect yourselves from the sun, folks. It will only continue to get hotter and become more dangerous, so, in the meantime, let’s try our best to be proactive about the situation.


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